Interview: Roberto Pazzi, photographer

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Born in Milan (Italy) in 1973, Roberto is a self-taught award winning travel photographer based in Palma (Spain). He is graduated in engineering and he loves to travel.

You can find him here:

Website: robertopazziphoto.com

E-mail: roberto_pazzi@hotmail.com

Instagram: @roberto_pazzi_photography

Twitter: @RobertoPazziPh

Linkedin: @robertopazzi

Facebook: @RobertoPazziPhotographer

Roberto found himself to be a backpacker from an early age, but only in 2013 he started to explore his great love for photography. In 2015, the old passion for traveling and the new one for photography, made him decide to change his life completly.

Today Roberto has permanent expositions in Singapore and Palma and he is also one of the authors for the Brazilian gallery Luka.Art. He has launched his own photographic expeditions proposal and a selection of Roberto’s most iconic photographs is available as Limited Edition prints.

Roberto has been invited to take part in many exhibitions around the world and his works have been published by several media of different coutries. He published eight books.

  1. Hi Roberto, how long have you been working as a photographer now?

I’m working as a photographer since 2013.

  1. What inspired you to become a photographer? What were your first steps?

I didn’t have any particular inspiration to become a photographer. Probably it has been only my need to fix in my mind some moments and events I was experiencing when I wastraveling.

I started photography just bringing with me a pretty good camera during my travel to Insonesia in 2013. By sharing those shots on the web, the ones I took in Papua has been noticed and published on the most important newspapers in UK. One week later the same happened with my shots from India. At that point I took advantege of some collaborations started up thanks to the visibility I had gained on the web.

  1. Are you a professional or an amateur photographer?

As photography is something I really love, I’m consider me someone in the middle. Thanks to photography, I finally discovered what I really “want to do” and found the strength to abandon a life that I was carrying on only with what I “had to do” instead.

  1. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

As a travel photographer I like in particular antropological photography. I like to describe cultures and traditions of people living in remote places around the world.

  1. What kit do you shoot with?

My gear consits in two bodies, a Nikon D810 and a Nikon D610 and in the following lenses:

  • Nikon AF-S 16-35mm f/4G ED VR
  • Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8G ED
  • Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1.8G
  • Nikon AF-S 70-200mm f/4G ED N VR
Mundari people in the cattle camp at sunrise (Terekeka, South Sudan).

Mundari people in the cattle camp at sunrise (Terekeka, South Sudan).

  1. How would you define your photographic style?

My style is very close to the concept of reportage. I try to describe a culture by the people and their traditions. I like as much as possible to tell the stories of those people by the images of them and their environments.

  1. Which editing software do you usually use?

I usually perform my editing  using at 70-80% Lightroom and 20-30% Photoshop.

  1. John Wanamaker said: Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I do not know which half. Do you gain your clients by advertising or in another way?

I gain clients by my own advertising I add in the descrition of my works when sharing them on my portfolios.

  1. How does your typical working day look like? What do you do when you are not working? How many hours/days per week are you working? What do you do in your free time?

As my work is also my passion, I work 7 days a week and up to 10-12 hours a day. When I’m not traveling, usually I spend my morning working on the new publication of my work on my porfolios and social networks, and with them I share also my advertising. I spend also some hours in the afternoon on the organization of my next photographic expeditions. In the evening I usually work on my photos I collected during the last travels.

During my spare time I like to run along the beach, to train myself in gym, take long walk around the city with my camera, read a book, chill out with close friends.

  1. What would you do differently if you would start again?

I would do everything again but… earlier!

Portrait of Mundari people in the callte camp (Terekeka, South Sudan).

Portrait of Mundari people in the callte camp (Terekeka, South Sudan).

  1. A professional photographer is also an entrepreneur. Entrepreneurs have many things in common. They read a lot. What about you? What are your favorite books?

The first books I’m thinking at are:

  • Count of Monte Cristo (Alexandre Dumas)
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas (John Boyne)
  • The Kite Runner (Khaled Hosseini)
  • The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)
  • and the historical novels in general.
  1. What was the best advice you have ever received as a photographer? Do you have any advice for other photographers?

I didn’t have any advice as I’m self-taught photographer. To other photographers I would suggest don’t lose money looking for the newest technology, but to practice a lot instead. The first thing to understand is what they like more in photography. It is a very huge field to explore. Once understood that, they should identify their own style in their works. To be able to do that, they should study a lot (avoid classes, internet is a very complete library that can provide you everything you need), practice a lot (photograph again and again every day everything and everyone…) and train their eyes by looking at the works of other photographers, looking for inspirations.

I suggest to create a long-term project to achieve the final goal and let the passion be the fuel that runs their engine.

It is important to learn how to break down the main project into smaller, feasible daily ones, trying to comple the little project of the day (e.g. that technique, that photo, your website, etc…). Last but not least, as much as possible I suggest to try to spend time to perform photography theiy really like instead to follow what is bringing them money (it would be perfect if they are the same things…).

  1. Top 3 mobile apps on your smartphone?
  • WhatsApp
  • Instagram
  • Messenger
  1. Top 3 websites?
  1. Your last vacation?

Today!

 

Roberto’s work:
Portrait of an elderly potter at work (Bhaktapur, Nepal).

Portrait of an elderly potter at work (Bhaktapur, Nepal).

Portrait of a young Dani archer (Papua, Indonesia).

Portrait of a young Dani archer (Papua, Indonesia).

Portrait of a Dani leader with his warriors (Papua, Indonesia).

Portrait of a Dani leader with his warriors (Papua, Indonesia).

Portrait of a Mursi woman with her baby (Omo Valley, Ethiopia).

Portrait of a Mursi woman with her baby (Omo Valley, Ethiopia).

Portrait of a Karo Man with his son (Omo Valley, Ethiopia)

Portrait of a Karo Man with his son (Omo Valley, Ethiopia).

Portrait of a Bakhtiari man with his wife (Zagros Mountains, Iran).

Portrait of a Bakhtiari man with his wife (Zagros Mountains, Iran).

Portrait od a lutist in his workshop (Kerman, Iran)

Portrait od a lutist in his workshop (Kerman, Iran).

Portrait of a Buddhist monk (Angkor Wat, Cambodia).

Portrait of a Buddhist monk (Angkor Wat, Cambodia).

Portrait of a sadhu (Varanasi, India).

Portrait of a sadhu (Varanasi, India).

Portrait of a child in a factory of bricks (Bhaktapur, Nepal).

Portrait of a child in a factory of bricks (Bhaktapur, Nepal).

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